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've been a fish or a bird or a game species of some kind or a forest. when we think about the environment and our place and i come the species of concern became us. what we do to the environment and what we do to ourselves in the process. so i think when i looked back five decades in the rearview mirror, we can actually see the beginnings of this change in the way we think about the national world. michael rachel carson fault line come a tipping point between these two things. she had a strong presence in conservation movement, which i'll talk about in a moment and was really an affect the founder of the modern environmental movement. i think it's possible to actually point to a specific moment in time when that happened, when we began to think differently about the environment and our relation to it. it came in the late summer of 1962 about a month before rachel "silent spring" is an unpublished. in june of 1962 come at the yorker published three long excerpts. through the course of the summary huge controversy flared up around the book and people began to take sides on it and people beg
in the marketplace of ideas. there's good reason for that. creature grew up in environments where we were always subject to threat. we're looking at that thing that is going to hurt us. we are no longer in the environment. we're in a complex economy the inner dependent that really relies on organizations to provide us with the necessities. so we have to update our thinking, and think longer term, focus on stories that actually represent trends, and not compage -- exaggerate noise. we have to get away from fear. fear played a role in the development of human societies in the earliest stages, it's encoded in the dna, but to evolve, to a sort of complex modern stliermt we live in, we have to update the most basic aspects, so that's what your question speaks to if. >> -- full venture capitalist? >> you know, the opposite of that might be say, well, venture capitalist has to be inherently optimistic, why would you invest in thing where there are uncertain returns and so forth. telling the story about "the coming prosperity." that's a story, you know, easily characterized. and i really don't see it th
something we can do about. it's how the thing we're doing to the environment are making these things more unbearable. for example, construction, you know, soon after the earthquake in haiti thereu was an earthqua in chile that killed on slightly same level or killed less than 100 people.at and ours ended up killing so many people. we are a city of badly constructed buildings and all of the things. people had been forced to leave the country side to come to the city to work. you had the den population.oce we often discuss these things and how the environment, howse erosion, how the land, how the fact that we have to burn ourn i trees forn charcoal causes us have the massive mudslides and flooding when a hurricane goest through. so these things, too, i thinka more of the things question do something about as a community. we that -- the other theory are also -- [inaudible] talked about.t >> in reading through "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know" i was struck by the fact that so manyb writers yearn in a sense to return to haiti. >> i think so many
holding unpopular views. the author contends this environment has increased the country's political and decreased this course. it's about 45 minutes. [applause] thanks so much for having me. i was at that first conference and we had randy barnett speaking over there and was exciting to be here for the inauguration from the organization. i'm going to start on a little bit of a personal note. i'm having a big month and i want to let you know since some of your friends of mine and some of you will be. i just got married on the 12th. [applause] i have a book come out on tuesday called campus censorship and the end of the american debate and i am leaving right after this for my 20 it high school reunion took about how free speech is curtailed on the modern american campus and how i believe it harms us all whether we are on campus or not. why did i write this? i wrote "unlearning liberty" because i went to stanford specifically to study the first amendment. it's been a passion of mine my entire life. i believe it is in part i have a russian father and a british mother and i definitely cam
environment. i'm not saying that they are more welcoming to media attention, but they came of age in a world where they -- remember, look, justice scalia has written a book, justice thomas has written a book, justice breyer. william o. douglas, justice sonia sotomayor is writing a book. i think it's great when they go out in public and write books and talk about it and become a little more accessible. >> it's funny about "the brethren" because the law clerks born before "the brethren" feel that byron white's relationship with this clerks changed bought he was furious about the leaks, determined to figure out who leaked and the clerks think something changed and the rules in the chambers and conversations with the justices, et cetera. i don't knee whether the justice -- all their attitudes have changed but when you look at newspaper articles that were written at the time to disclose chambers, written by eddie has lazarus, and sure surrogates who were saying this young man should be tarred and feathered, and scalia said if any of his law clerks did that, he would hunt them down. i think some w
in the environment and tripping heavily over reputation low-risk. wells is a company with a culture of customer focus and restraint and td bank provides a simple lesson if you don't understand it, don't invest in it. each of these terms applied strong governance, good management, operational confidence and discipline but with different approaches. some of these firms had serious problems since the crisis and jpmorgan chase actually lost billions of dollars in their london office in an event that reveals poor risk-management. the point here is these terms have successful strategies for weathering the crisis. there's a difference between taking a large loss such as jpmorgan recently took and having the company failed. the companies that failed the crisis did not just take losses but went out of business, required massive amounts of taxpayer aid, ended their existence as independent companies. and successful firms included fannie mae and freddie mac, bear stearns, lehman, merrill lynch, citigroup, wachovia, ubs, aig, and wamu. with variations they exhibited similar shortcomings in organization, governan
and the same environment we are, speak the same language, these are choices and choices about how we run markets. the distribution of marketing, there is a lot you can do, it is choice about what you do after words as well, providing universal health coverage or provide decent support or an educational system that is well funded for everybody, not just people in the right neighborhoods. >> and the tax system is obviously important, not only for inequality opportunity, but also growth. so for instance if you have a tax system like ours where speculators are taxed at a different rate than if people who work for a living or from any into a bank account in the cayman islands rather than peak united states, you have extended the rules not only to give lower taxes, tax rates to those who avail themselves of these, but distorts the economy and you wind up with more speculation. the money isn't in the cayman islands because it grows better in the sunshine. lack of sunshine, is the reason people keep their money there. >> i had a conversation with someone from the financial industry trying to mak
on batteries. and that is money. this is better you and the environment. is not only better for mother earth but it saves money and last longer. shipping! flexpay in price only good for my show. we have 3000 of them. how quickly can you call? lori leland (...) >>guest: we sold out of the point and shoot oylmpus serveearlier so now we brought back the slr style, your favor. this is a great zoom to get you closer than ever before in the palm of your hand. this is 14 oz yet you get all the bells and whistles. a stunning 3 in. screen. one of olympus up. ' is the one-touch button 720 p hi-def video right here. shannon mentioned the beauty-mode and fix. i love the grip because you feel so stable and steady. when we start talking about 36 times optical-zoom we are going to get you closer than you thought you could ever get for this price point. friend is out here doing the paddle boarding. re all the way in at full 36 times. --getting closer. i could see the water bottle on the tip of the board. about with this ground- breaking lens your mind will be blown. these are the pictures we have become
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8